Category Archives: preservation stories

February 11, 2014 All News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Historic Tax Credit, Ohio The Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program provides a tax

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The Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program provides a tax credit equal to 25 percent of Qualified Rehabilitation Expenditures incurred as part of historic rehabilitation projects at National Register sites and districts. The Program is highly competitive and receives applications bi-annually in March and September. Applications are evaluated with an objective scoring system measuring each project’s economic impact, community benefit and return on investment to state and local governments.
The following information is shared with permission from the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program‘s 2012 Annual Report. Lead in image of Erie Terminal Place courtesy of developers, NYO Property Group.

Recent Legislation affecting Ohio Historic Tax Credits

Ohio HTC Projects in ’12: 63
Millions in Investment: $780
Permanent Jobs: 7, 120

Two pieces of legislation approved by the Ohio General Assembly during 2012 impact the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit Program. Known as the DSA Bill, Senate Bill 314 became effective on September 28, 2012 and allows long-term lessees to participate in the program as an applicant. Prior to this change, only the fee simple owner of the historic building could apply.

Signed by Governor Kasich on December 20, 2012, House Bill 510 created the financial institutions tax (FIT) to replace corporate franchise and dealer in intangibles taxes. The legislation includes a provision to allow the Ohio Historic Preservation Tax Credit to be taken against liability for the FIT. Currently, the credit can be taken against the corporate franchise and dealer in intangibles taxes, which will be phased out at the end of 2013.

Erie Terminal Place, Youngstown, OH

Looking at the Erie Terminal Building, it appears to be just a normal office building. If you look a little closer, however, you may notice clues that suggest its unique past as a passenger train depot. The six-story building opened in 1922 to provide both a passenger station and office space for the Erie Railroad. The rear of the building was set along railroad tracks, allowing passengers to catch trains to New York, Chicago and major Midwest destinations until service was discontinued in 1976.

The Project

Reborn as Erie Terminal Place after a $12 million rehabilitation, the upper five floors of the property have been converted into 40 apartment units for up to 65 young professionals working in the Mahoning Valley and students at the adjacent Youngstown State University. The property’s lower floors offer several commercial storefronts to serve as amenities for the residents and to Downtown Youngstown, creating 40 jobs inside the building. Trains may no longer stop, but the Erie Terminal Building is bustling again.

Qualified Expenditures
Approx. $10.5M*
Figure from Ohio Development Services Agency

Historic Tax Credits
Approx. $3.2M
Figure from The Vindicator

Promotional Video of the New Apartments by NYO Property Group

For some young professionals, leaving their hometowns after college is all they can imagine. Revitalized downtowns and diverse living opportunities, however, can make the decision to come back home both easier and attractive.

Erie Terminal residents Danny Buccino, 25, and Dave Murdoch, 31, embody the types of young talent Ohio communities want to retain. Both grew up in the suburbs of Youngstown, but did not see themselves living in the city after college. Buccino attended the University of Toledo and most recently lived in Connecticut. Murdoch attended Youngstown State and planned to leave the area after graduation.

Today, Buccino is a component engineer with Delphi Automotive in Warren. Murdoch is running his family business, an industrial garage door supplier that is seeing unprecedented growth because of the oil and gas industry. Both are thrilled to be part of the rebirth of Downtown Youngstown and were attracted to Erie Terminal Place because of its proximity to restaurants, nightlife and civic amenities within walking distance, something they note as one of the reasons their friends are attracted to other cities.

Buccino and Murdoch believe Erie Terminal has helped change attitudes about the potential for Downtown Youngstown. “This project has uplifted the area from a place no one wanted to be, to a showplace for the region. I’ve never looked at Youngstown with a brighter light,” Murdoch said.

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February 1, 2014 All News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Texas Texas gave Preservation Action a Lone-Star welcome January 27-31, 2014. In the state wh

<!–/ .post-meta Legislators and preservationists visit statue of Barbara Johnson.

Texas gave Preservation Action a Lone-Star welcome January 27-31, 2014. In the state where the founding inspiration for a national coalition of preservation-focused grassroots activists began, now Preservation Action, State Senator Rodney Ellis and Licia Green-Ellis hosted a reception and meetings with preservationists to share ideas and works underway in historic preservation.

Politicos with hearts in preservation, Senator Ellis and his wife have championed support for historic preservation projects in Houston and Texas and through national organizations. Friends of preservation, former US Congressman Craig Washington, Sylvia Brooks a consultant on Emancipation Park, Stephanie Jones and David Bush of Preservation Houston, Anna Mod of Prairie View A&M University and several students from the preservation program joined Preservation Action at a reception at the Ellis’ home. Darlene Taylor, President of Preservation Action and Hal Fairbanks, member of the Preservation Action Executive Committee attended.

Minnette Boesel, Assistant for Cultural Affairs to Houston Mayor Annise D. Parker, met with Preservation Action. Boesel spoke fondly of working with Nellie Longsworth, President of Preservation Action 1974-1998 and serving as Chair of Preservation Action urging congress for a national rehabilitation tax credit.

From Houston, the preservation welcome tour included preservation and cultural heritage activities across neighborhoods and continued to Austin and the state capitol building. Mark Wolfe and Vaughn Aldredge of the Texas Historical Commission joined Preservation Action to discuss funding for historic preservation and the upcoming National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week.

As the National Conference of State Legislators Executive Committee gathered in Austin for their annual meeting, Senator Ellis led Preservation Action on a tour of the capitol building. Senators Ellis and gathered with legislators and Preservation Action. Taylor and Fairbanks joined the bike ride through Austin neighborhoods and around the state capitol.

To learn more about state issues and deepen Preservation Action’s engagement with members, friends, and legislators, we will continue to meet advocates in their home states and connect advocates and legislators in discussions about the importance of historic preservation.

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June 20, 2013 Advocacy Week, All News, Member News, Preservation Stories No Comments Before I participated in the 2013 National Historic Preservation Advocacy

<!–/ .post-meta Members of the the North Carolina Delegation from University of North Carolina Greensboro during Advocacy Week 2013, pictured here with Representative Richard Hudson.

Before I participated in the 2013 National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, I considered myself a pretty informed, passionate preservation graduate student. I could talk ad nauseam about how much I love old buildings—the stories they tell, the history the represent, the beauty they reflect. I knew all about the environmental benefits of rehab projects. I even knew all about the economic benefits of preservation.

Student delegates from University of North Carolina Greensboro produced a film documenting their experiences at Advocacy Week, 2009.

Student delegates from University of North Carolina Greensboro produced a film documenting their experiences at Advocacy Week, 2009.

It was really only after I participated in in Lobby Day that I felt like I could really talk about preservation in a really persuasive way. My cohort and I (all first-year graduate students at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro) had prepared for the event during our Preservation Law course the previous semester, and the and Preservation Action and National Council of State Historic Preservation Officers staff also gave us a wealth of information to use in our meetings on the Hill the next day.

However, the meetings themselves were by far some of the most educational experiences I have had in my program. Part of it was simple repetition; with thirteen Representatives and the two Senators representing North Carolina, we each participated in at least eight meetings that day. More than that, the experience was truly empowering; the first meeting was nerve-wracking, but by lunchtime, my group had worked out a routine and I had gained so much confidence.

It’s one thing to know why preservation is important. It’s another to be able to effectively articulate its importance to others. Lobby Day was a chance for my cohort to put theory into practice, and it was an invaluable experience.

In addition to becoming a more self-assured and confident preservationist, I was also energized and inspired by the great people I met during my Lobby Day experience. Meeting the SHPOs, Preservation Action and NCSHPO staff, and the other activists and developers who joined my cohort in our meetings left me sure that I was entering the right field and excited to feel like I could make a difference.

preservationaction-sunnytownesstewart

Sunny Townes Stewart is a lifelong preservationist, even though she only actually realized it a couple of years ago. In 2012, she left her job at an art and history museum to pursue what has become her passion. She is currently enrolled in the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s History/Historic Preservation graduate program and will graduate with her second master’s degree in August 2014 (she earned her first in history from Appalachian State University). She lives in the mountain town of Boone, North Carolina. Learn more about Sunny and her preservation adventures on her personal blog, a touch of history.

Preservation Action sends a special thank you to Sunny for volunteering to spend the Sunday before Lobby Day with us prepping for over 250 preservationists to descend upon The Hill!

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June 20, 2013 Advocacy Week, All News, Member News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Louisiana Executive Director of the Preservation Resource Center of

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Executive Director of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, Patty Gay, reported on her recent advocacy work in her state in “Preservation Time in Washington and Baton Rouge,” originally published in her organization’s monthly magazine, Preservation in Print, the most frequently published preservation periodical available. Posted on the Preservation Action website with permission.

Preservation Time in Washington and Baton Rouge

New Orleans preservationists have been traveling to Washington and Baton Rouge seeking support for preservation funding and the state and federal rehab tax credits. We enthusiastically work on this because historic preservation programs have a major impact on economic development in Louisiana, as well as on quality of life in neighborhoods, towns and cities across the state.

With more support for preservation programs that bring empty and underutilized commercials buildings back into commerce and draw residents to the urban core of the city, there would be more tax revenues for education and other services that state and local governments are expected to provide. Plus, the end result of every preservation project makes any place more attractive for additional investment.

Our delegation to Washington included George Brower, Hal Fairbanks, Tara Hernandez and me from New Orleans, Carolyn Bennett and Ben Dupuy from Baton Rouge, Rod Scott from Mandeville, and Nicole Hobson-Morris who presented reports prepared by the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) on preservation activity in every congressional district.

In Washington we had the following requests to Louisiana Members of Congress from Louisiana:

a

Support the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) at $55.9 million for the entire country. This fund goes to SHPOs in every state and is essential for those offices to process rehab tax credits, maintain the National Register program and process Section 106 reviews as required in the National Preservation Act of 1966. The HPF, which comes from offshore oil lease revenues, was authorized at $150 million per year in the 1970s, but has never again come close to an allocation of that size. All Congressional House representatives have been urged to sign on to the “Dear Colleague” letter in support of the HPF at $59 million (for the entire country).

b

Support the Creating American Prosperity through Preservation Act (CAPP), which includes enhancements to the federal rehab tax credit, or historic tax credit (HTC). These include increasing the percentage of rehab costs for smaller projects from 20 percent to 30 percent, and a measure that would make it easier for non-profit organizations, including schools, to access the credit. We urge all Louisiana congressional representatives to become sponsors for this bill.

c

Join the bi-partisan House Preservation Caucus, co-chaired by Mike Turner, R-Ohio and Rush Holt, D-New Jersey. Thank you Cedric Richmond and Rodney Alexander for signing on last year. We hope all other representatives from Louisiana will join this caucus since preservation programs have such a great economic impact in Louisiana.

In Baton Rouge preservationists from across the state are working on several bills that would maintain the effectiveness of the state rehab credits (both income-producing and homeowner), should the existing tax structure change:

a

HB 630, relative to the commercial tax credit, is sponsored by Representatives Leger, Brossett, Buford, H. Burns, Jefferson, Moreno and P. Williams as well as Senator Morrell.

b

SB 208, a bill running concurrently with HB 630 and also relative to the commercial tax credit, is sponsored by Senator Riser and Buffington and Representatives Leger and P. Williams.

c

SB 64 (Morrell) would extend the commercial rehabilitation tax credit until 2020. The tax credit is currently scheduled to sunset at the end of 2015.

d

SB 197 relative to the homeowner rehabilitation tax credit is by Senators Riser and Morrell and Representatives Buford and P. Williams.

We are grateful for all of the sponsors of the above bills and urge PRC members to contact them in support of their efforts to preserve the effectiveness of the state rehabilitation tax credits.

Further, PRC is monitoring several other bills introduced during this legislative session, including:

a

HB 256 (Williams) is a constitutional amendment that provides for the redemption period for blighted, abandoned, uninhabitable or hazardous property sold at tax sale. The current law provides that, in New Orleans, abandoned or blighted properties sold at tax sale are redeemable for 18 months after the date of retardation of the tax sale. The proposed constitutional amendment would be applicable statewide and shorten the redemption period to 12 months after retardation of the tax sale. (Note: the bill was amended on April 10, changing the redemptive period statewide to 18 months as is the law currently in New Orleans, eliminating the 12-month limit.)

b

HB 377 (Leger) creates a tax credit registry to track transfers, claims and refunds of tax credits, including the rehab tax credits.

c

HB 444 (Burrell) and HB 587 (Robideaux) calls for legislative review of all tax credits, including the preservation tax credits. (There already exists an administrative review for tax credits.) The House Committee on Ways and Means and the Senate Committee on Revenue and Fiscal Affairs would review tax credits to determine if the economic benefit provided by such credit outweighs the loss of revenue realized by the state as a result of awarding such credit. The committees would make recommendations by March 1, 2015, to continue or terminate the credit. Preservationists would welcome such a review, as rehab tax credits have been proven through many studies to generate more tax revenues than credits given.

d

HB 501 (Moreno) extends the sunset of the musical and theatrical production investment income tax credit, which allows the rehab tax credit to be used for the renovation of historic theaters and support facilities.

e

HB 516 (Leger) expands the authority of the Ernest N. Morial-New Orleans Expedition Hall Authority, including authorization of a Phase V expansion project. Of specific concern to preservationists, the bill also authorizes the Convention Center to fund the demolition of the World Trade Center building.

f

HB 546 (Moreno) and HB 595 (Abramson) regards the transfer or lease of the historic New Orleans Adolescent Hospital campus. Neither bill addresses reuse of the existing structures.

g

HB 657 (Abramson) would legally obligate the Department of Safety and Permits to make permits and other information available on the internet within a specified time period.

h

SB 140 (Morrell) enables (but does not mandate) the City of New Orleans to establish a maximum penalty at $5,000 or imprisonment of six months in the parish jail for violations of any parish ordinance, including code enforcement. Currently the statutory cap for such violations is $500 per instance per day, which must be documented each day.

Follow PRC’s blog and Facebook page for periodic updates on the Louisiana legislative session and, if needed, for requests to preservationists to take action. Also follow PRC advocacy on Twitter @PRCNO for live tweets from legislative committee meetings and from the House and Senate chambers. Most importantly, please be sure to thank those legislators who are working diligently for preservation in this legislative session. Find out how to contact them by visiting PRC’s blog at blog.prcno.org.

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April 22, 2014 All News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Georgia, Historic Tax Credits, Preservation’s Best During National Historic Preservation Advoca

<!–/ .post-meta Bryan Nichols, developer of the Warehouse Lofts accepting his Preservation's Best award.

During National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, six projects were awarded “Preservation’s Best.” Congressional Historic Preservation Caucus Co-Chairs Michael Turner and Rush Holt, along with US Senators and Members of Congress representing the project winners attended to recognize and present the award to their constituents.

Through federal incentives like the historic tax credit, historic preservation drives economic development and community revitalization across the nation by taking historically significant buildings, that are dated and abandoned, and turning them into viable community assets in a 21st Century economy. “Preservation’s Best of 2013” highlight exemplary historic tax credit projects that revitalize our cities and small towns, and breathe new life into our communities.

Sponsored and Presented by:
preservation-action-logo-web

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Warehouse Lofts, Macon, GA

In 2009, local developer Bryan Nichols of Nichols Investment Group, LLC saw an opportunity to create more downtown housing units by rehabilitating the historic Scofield Iron Works Showroom, originally constructed in 1900 and located in Macon’s industrial and commercial center.

While some developers struggled during the recent recession, Bryan Nichols was able to thrive because of the tax incentives. Nichols has been able to refurbish several loft units downtown as well as convert an abandoned storefront into the Taste and See coffee house on Poplar Street. Without the incentives, Nichols said he likely would have focused most of his development in north Macon. “If you invest in something, you get something in return,” he said. “You’re preserving (a historic) building and getting something in return for doing it.” – Philip Ramati, Athens Banner Herald

The Warehouse Lofts, a 15,000-square-foot building features loft-style apartments with restored wood-sash windows, historic interior brickwork and updated plumbing and duct-work systems. Completed in 2010, this $385,000 project was a catalyst for more than $16 million in other projects in downtown Macon.

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Nichols Investment Group in the News

No end in sight for downtown Macon’s fast-pace commercial, residential growth,” The Telegraph
Macon leads Georgia in historic preservation efforts,” Athens Banner-Herald
Taste and See” the new coffee shop in Downtown Macon,” The Mercer Cluster

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April 29, 2014 All News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Advocacy Week, Historic Tax Credits, Maryland, Preservation’s Best During National Historic Pre

<!–/ .post-meta Baltimore's Restored Mill No. 1. Image courtesy Terra Nova Ventures, LLC.

During National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, six projects were awarded “Preservation’s Best.” Congressional Historic Preservation Caucus Co-Chairs Michael Turner and Rush Holt, along with US Senators and Members of Congress representing the project winners attended to recognize and present the award to their constituents.

Through federal incentives like the historic tax credit, historic preservation drives economic development and community revitalization across the nation by taking historically significant buildings, that are dated and abandoned, and turning them into viable community assets in a 21st Century economy. “Preservation’s Best of 2013” highlight exemplary historic tax credit projects that revitalize our cities and small towns, and breathe new life into our communities.

Sponsored and Presented by:
preservation-action-logo-web

national-trust-for-historic-preservation-logo

ntcici-logo

Mill No. 1, Baltimore, MD

Mill No. 1 enjoys an important history along the Jones Falls, starting as a cotton mill in 1847 and in 1973 becoming the home of Life Like Products. The Mount Vernon Company, which operated several mills in the Jones Valley, became the world’s largest producer of cotton duck in the late 19th century, supplying cotton for sails, uniforms, tents and parachutes for the army. The collection of buildings, listed on the National Register for Historic Places, dates from 1845 to 1918.

Rep. Elijah Cummings congratulates David Tufaro of Terra Nova Ventures on the restoration of Mill No. 1; also pictured, Jennifer Nolley, Charles Alexander, Betty Bird, Vicki Vaughn and Kimberly Laird.

Rep. Elijah Cummings congratulates David Tufaro of Terra Nova Ventures on the restoration of Mill No. 1; also pictured, Jennifer Nolley, Terra Nova Ventures;  Betty Bird, historic consultant; Vicki Vaughn, Chesapeake Community Advisors; and Kimberly Laird, Bank of America.

Terra Nova Ventures, LLC, used a mix of financing from state and federal historic tax credits and new market tax credits to rehabilitate Mill No. 1 into offices, apartments, and restaurants. The buildings rehabilitated in accordance with historic preservation guidelines included Mt. Vernon Mill No. 1, a concrete warehouse building, the “Picker Building” and the “Store House.”

The project included restoring the historic architecture and character of the buildings while rebuilding the interior to fit new uses, including apartments, office, restaurant spaces, and parking. Restaurant spaces will be located in the 3,859 sf boiler room, featuring a clerestory and exposed stone walls and in the 4,405 sf Picker building, featuring vaulted ceilings, exposed stone and brick walls, overlooking of the Jones Falls. The office spaces contain approximately 42,000 sf with views of the Jones Falls and unique spaces. The 90 apartments will be a blend of studio, studio lofts, one bedroom and two bedroom spaces averaging 908 sf with market rate rents, situated in the building so as to command views of the river. Parking to serve the mixed use will be contained primarily within the large mill building, with a few surface spaces.

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More Building History

Content courtesy Terra Nova Ventures, LLC

Mill No. 1 enjoys an important history along the Jones Falls starting as a cotton mill in 1847 and in 1973 becoming the home of Life Like Properties, a model train and hobbies warehouse. In 1847, David Carroll and Horatio Gambrill converted Laurel Mill to Mount Vernon Mill No. 1 and started Mt. Vernon Company with William Kennedy. The large mill, known as Mt. Vernon Mill No. 1 was built in 1873 following a fire that destroyed the original 1847 building. The small L- shaped building, known as the “Picker Building” dates from 1873 with a later addition in 1879. The “Store House” was a later addition and concrete building, connected to the Mill No. 1 by a pedestrian bridge, was built in 1918. All of these buildings create a unique piece of history along the beautiful setting of the Jones Falls and are well connected to the surrounding mill neighborhoods, including Stone Hill and Brick Hill, built by the Mount Vernon Company for employee housing. In the late 19th Century, the company provided the world’s largest supply of cotton duck, supplying cloth for uniforms, knapsacks, tents, and parachutes during the Civil War, WWI and WWII. In 1973, the Mt. Vernon Company sold the buildings to Life-Like, and continues production to this day in North Carolina.

View Site Map →

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April 15, 2014 All News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Chicago, Historic Tax Credits During National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, six projects

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During National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, six projects were awarded “Preservation’s Best.” Congressional Historic Preservation Caucus Co-Chairs Michael Turner and Rush Holt, along with US Senators and Members of Congress representing the project winners attended to recognize and present the award to their constituents.

Through federal incentives like the historic tax credit, historic preservation drives economic development and community revitalization across the nation by taking historically significant buildings, that are dated and abandoned, and turning them into viable community assets in a 21st Century economy. “Preservation’s Best of 2013” highlight exemplary historic tax credit projects that revitalize our cities and small towns, and breathe new life into our communities.

Sponsored and Presented by:
preservation-action-logo-web

national-trust-for-historic-preservation-logo

ntcici-logo

Harvest Commons, Chicago, IL

Development partners Heartland Housing and First Baptist Congregational Church transformed the former Viceroy Hotel, originally built in 1929, into an affordable apartment community containing 89 studio units serving near homeless individuals as well as women recently released from prison seeking to rebuild their live, now known as Harvest Commons.

In 1930 the Union Park Hotel opened as an “apartment hotel” for workers new to Chicago in need of temporary housing. From 1963 to the mid 2000s, under new ownership and with a new name, the Viceroy Hotel steadily fell into serious decline. The building became an epicenter for crime and unsanitary living conditions in the neighborhood. Closed and taken over by the City in 2004 the hotel sat vacant on Warren Boulevard, stripped by looters, and heavily vandalized. In 2009 Heartland Housing and First Baptist Congregational Church won the Request for Proposal and began the hard work of transforming the building into Harvest Commons.

Detailed Project Presentation hosted by Chicago Architecture Foundation

As a landmarked Art Deco building maintaining as much historical integrity as possible was a high priority during the rehab process at Harvest Commons. Heartland Housing’s commitment to sustainability also informed many modifications to the existing structure and upon completion was certified as an Enterprise Green Community building. To encourage tenant participation in the the sustainability process and provide access to healthy food options, an on-site sustainable agriculture program was implemented.

Funding sources for the $22.3 million project included equity generated by federal historic and low-income housing tax credits, the Illinois Affordable Housing Tax Credit, tax-increment financing from the city, and a state grant. The federal tax credits were syndicated by Enterprise Community Investment, Inc. and the state tax credits taken by U.S. Bancorp CDC.

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July 3, 2014 All News, Preservation Stories 1 Comment Tags: Arizona, Pennsylvania, Texas, Transportation Amtrak’s Great American Stations Project Approxi

<!–/ .post-meta Completed Kingman train station. Photo courtesy of the City of Kingman.

Amtrak’s Great American Stations Project

Approximately one-third of all Amtrak-served stations are listed on the National Register, and many are also included on state and/or local registers. The depot is one of the most visible reminders of America’s extensive railroad heritage and represents a variety of architectural styles. Train stations can ignite economic development, spur tourism and historic preservation efforts, figure into public realm improvements, and serve as sites for cultural uses.

Amtrak’s Great American Stations Project website offers information related to historic designation, historic preservation tax credits and depot preservation case studies. Through annual Civic Conversations, Amtrak hosts conferences for city, state and railroad officials to discuss strategies for building, preserving, restoring and upgrading existing Amtrak-served train stations.

Amtrak notes that a dozen federal grant programs have proven useful for station improvements that run the gamut from installing a new roof to repointing mortar. The Federal Highway Administration’s Transportation Alternatives (TA) program (formerly known as Transportation Enhancements (TE)) has been a tool for preservation and rehabilitation of historic transportation facilities.

In Greensburg, Pa., Westmoreland Cultural Trust used a $1.3 million TE grant to renovate the town’s Jacobean Revival depot in the mid-1990s. A successful mixed-use project, the building today houses a farm-to-table restaurant, passenger waiting area and professional offices. A $2.2 million TE grant matched with approximately $542,000 in local funds enabled the city of Longview, Texas, to renovate its depot. Workers rebuilt the original dormer windows and restored an open-air waiting room that had been enclosed. In addition to passenger functions, the multimodal transportation center now includes community meeting space and offices for the Union Pacific Railroad and police department.

Amtrak serves more than 500 destinations in 46 states, but the majority of stations are owned and managed by municipalities, transit authorities and private freight railroads. Amtrak established the Great American Stations Project to educate communities on the benefits of redeveloping train stations, offer tools to civic leaders to preserve their stations and other resources.

For more information on the program, contact Amtrak via their website.

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November 8, 2013 All News, Preservation Stories No Comments Tags: Indiana, National Preservation Conference The National Preservation Conference is an annual r

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The National Preservation Conference is an annual reminder of how proud Preservation Action is to have great members, partners and supporters that support our year-round advocacy on behalf of grassroots preservationists nationwide.
Old City Hall of Indianapolis, where learned about the name "Crossroads of America" and headed out on a walking tour of downtown Indianapolis.

Old City Hall of Indianapolis, where learned about the name “Crossroads of America” and headed out on a walking tour of downtown Indianapolis.

Lead in photo of the Indiana State Capital by Dana Saylor, historian at Old Time Roots, and Preservation Action Foundation volunteer.

For a week in Indianapolis, our staff participated in every way possible; sessions, panels, lunches, Preservation Action’s member meeting, and dance parties – and of course, the Preservation Action Foundation Auction. The auction and closing party were a great way to cap the conference this year thanks to a great host in Indiana Landmarks, and each and every donor and bidder.

Preservation Action’s new president, Darlene R. Taylor, jumped right into her role, discussing with members the need for increased communication between PA and our members. Additionally, Darlene indicated she hopes to increase the organization’s communication with members of Congress, along with an increase in communication between PA members and state and federal elected officials.

The highlight of the Conference for her was meeting face-to-face with our members and partners. Each conversation deepened her understanding of the state and local issues facing preservationists as she positions PA to better assist and serve our members. Recently, we’ve  worked with legislators on Hardest Hit Funding in Ohio and Michigan and the Biggert-Waters’ flood insurance reform bill. We also joined grassroots efforts in Texas that resulted in creation of a state historic tax credit. All of this was on the request of our members.

“The success of PA’s legislative advocacy relies heavily on you, our members, sharing information and raising your voice to advocate on the issues most important to you,” said Taylor. Until the importance of historic preservation is known to each member of Congress, our work is not done. I hope that you will join us in Washington, DC for Advocacy Week. We also want to meet with you and your representatives in your home cities and states, deepening our connection with your on-the-ground advocacy and strengthening our national network.”

Oxmoor

John, right, visiting his family’s estate, Oxmoor, in Louisville, KY, with architectural historian, Oscar Biesert.

Our Legislative Coordinator, John LaRue, who was instrumental in our lobbying and education work regarding the UNESCO dues issue, attended his second National Preservation Conference. He shared his research and analysis at the World Heritage booth, alongside US/ICOMOS, San Antonio Conservation Society, and volunteers from Ohio and Louisiana.

Today, November 8, 2013, the United States loses it vote in UNESCO, affecting our standing in the international group and potentially affecting our nominations to the World Heritage List.

John was particularly struck by the proactive work of the Gas and Preservation Partnership, introduced by Marion Werkheiser of Cultural Heritage Partners, during the Conference as an example of private companies voluntarily conducting cultural resource reviews before starting the fracking process. To round-out his trip, John and architectural historian Oscar Beisert, visited John’s family estate in Louisville, Kentucky, known as Oxmoor, a ca. 1785, operated by a family foundation.

meaganpanel

Meagan, far right, with the panelists of the session, “New Media, New Audiences” including, left to right, Dana Saylor of Old Time Roots, Julia Rocchi of the National Trust, Kaitlin O’Shea of Preservation in Pink, Kayla Jonas of Architectural Conservancy of Ontario, and Michelle Kimball of the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans.

As a professional preservationist and citizen advocate in Buffalo, NY prior to our work with us in DC, Meagan Baco, Program Coordinator, participated in many preservation projects, including two that she spoke on, including:

*

Creating the largest tax credit eligible National Register district in the Elmwood neighborhood with Clinton Brown Company Architecture, a Preservation Action member, that has brought in more than $2 million dollar of private investment into the neighborhood, along with the honor of official listing.

*

Leading the online portion of the grassroots I’m Steel Standing campaign to save the ca. 1901 Bethlehem Steel administration building from demolition in Lackawanna, NY that got national attention, including a plan to purchase the  building, and two law suits, but was ultimately unsuccessful.

That’s all when Meagan was not busy with auction intern, Carla Patterson, running the Silver Label Auction for the Preservation Action Foundation, that by all accounts was one of the best parties, thanks for the hard work of Indiana Landmarks, especially Marsh David, Lorraine Vavul, and Tina Connors, with help from Tina Hochberg at the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

As we turn our attention now to planning National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week coming up on March 2-6, 2014, we hope to see many Conference participants here on our tuff, in Washington, DC.

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May 17, 2013 All News, Member News, Preservation Stories No Comments Preservation Action, Legislative Update Volume 16, Number 20, May 17, 2013 → Preservation Action has been

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Preservation Action, Legislative Update
Volume 16, Number 20, May 17, 2013 →

Preservation Action has been working behind-the-scenes to update our website to make the resources, information, and news we provide to our members much easier to find and use.

We also want the website to be a place to showcase the work of our members and supporters that highlights the importance and influence of federal policies on historic preservation projects nationwide.

Ideas for what to send us:

  • A summary of a preservation initiative in your community that would not have happened without funding that originated at the HPF.
  • Before and after images of a historic building rehabilitated using the Historic Tax Credit or other federal incentive.
  • For those affected by Hurricane Sandy and other natural disasters, how did the historic preservation funding allocated in the relief bill assist your recovery?

We’re proud to be the collective voice of grassroots preservationists in the Capitol, and so we’d love to share your personal voice! Please feel free to share your experiences in preservation advocacy, how PA has been a part of your projects and career, your most memorable meeting with a member of Congress or a quote about the importance of preservation-positive policies and legislation in Washington.  Contribution of images also welcome and appreciated.

Suggestions?

Now is a great time to also suggest resources or features that Preservation Action may be able to provide in the new website.

Please direct all submissions and suggestions to mbaco@preservationaction.org or 202-637-7873.

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June 20, 2013 All News, Preservation Stories 1 Comment Tags: Historic Tax Credit, Projects Walker C. Johnson has been a member of Preservation Action for thirt

<!–/ .post-meta Entrance "After," Naperville Post Office, Photo by JLA Architects, 2012.

Walker C. Johnson has been a member of Preservation Action for thirty years. As a young professional, his background in history and architecture propelled him to become a key member in the preservation movement surrounding Chicago during the 1970s. Working in grassroots advocacy to rally public interest and organizational networks for historic preservation, Walker was a founding member of Landmarks Illinois and initiated the preservation branch of Holabird and Root architects/engineers.

Walker’s advocacy continues through his architectural preservation practice as a principal at Johnson Lasky Architects (JLA) and outside of the office through his continued leadership in organizations such as the American Institute of Architects (of which he is a Fellow), the Association for Preservation Technology, Landmarks Illinois, and the Society of Architectural Historians.

In the real world of preservation, one must understand the importance of the bottom line. Therefore, the opportunity to obtain historic tax incentives is a very important tool for preservation of historic buildings. Existence of this tool is often the deciding factor in choosing to reuse an existing historic structure or demoing the structure to rebuild from scratch. The use of tax incentives for historic preservation allows affordable reuse of buildings embedded in our cultural past which would otherwise become obsolete.

Wintrust Financial, the client for the Naperville Post Office reuse project, understands the importance of preserving these properties within their historyenriched communities as well as the benefits of historic preservation tax incentives. They continue to adapt historic properties for their use throughout the greater Chicagoland area, following the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for rehabilitation and obtaining preservation tax incentives for each.

Naperville Post Office Restoration Project

Location: Naperville, Illinois
Preservation Architect: Johnson Lasky Architects, Chicago, IL
Architect of Record: Charles Vincent George, Naperville, IL

In preparation for repurposing the 1939 Post Office building in historic downtown Naperville, Johnson Lasky Architects provided preservation-related design services and prepared a Historic Preservation Certification Application (HPCA) for historic tax credits for the client and architect of record. Application documentation included photographs of current conditions, historic images, narrative of the building’s history, statement of significance, and description and drawings of proposed work for the conversion into a bank.

To secure the property’s historic status and qualify the project for historic tax credits, JLA to also prepared an amendment to the National Register of Historic Places nomination for Naperville Historic District. This amendment updated the nomination to consider properties 50 years or older at the time of its approval (2012), including the Post Office building. This process entailed further research on the history of the city, photographic survey of the historic district, and extensive cataloging of the Naperville’s current historic building stock.

Before and After Images

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Special thank you to Carolyn Andrews, Project Architect at JLA, for her work preparing this article for Preservation Action. Johnson Lasky Architects, founded in 1992 by partners Walker C. Johnson and Larry M. Lasky, is a full service architecture firm with a specialty in working with existing structures and in historic preservation. Areas of work include the preservation of National Landmark buildings as well as architectural projects for universities, churches, the public schools, engineering concerns, and commercial and private clients. The office is a unique blend of architects, designers, planners, and historians.

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Last Chance auction items are perfect for holidays gifts to friends, family, and yourself! We have travel packages to DC, Detroit and more. See all items here! → Our annual auction is Preservation Action Foundation’s largest fundraiser and we app

paf-auction-2014

Last Chance auction items are perfect for holidays gifts to friends, family, and yourself! We have travel packages to DC, Detroit and more. See all items here! →
Our annual auction is Preservation Action Foundation’s largest fundraiser and we appreciate your support this year in Savannah.  The dollars in auction funds raised go to support the mission of the Preservation Action Foundation.

The proceeds from this event are used to assist in education and training, advocacy for preservation policy, and programs such as the Preservation Action Foundation’s Advocacy Scholars throughout the United States. Our most visible contributions to preservation advocacy are; a weekly Legislative Update, organizing National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, and Advocacy Scholars. The Preservation Action Foundation is a 501(c)(3) entity; your prize donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

 

Auction Sponsors

  • A. Roy Smith
  • Yolita Rausche
  • Michael Holleran
  • Peg Breen
  • Jenny Spreitzer
  • Philip Thomason
  • Trisha Logan<br>

Auction Donors

    Adventures in Preservation
    Alta Club
    Antrium 1844 Country House Hotel
    Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
    Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site
    Brenda Barrett
    Buffalo Heritage Unlimited
    C&O Canal Trust
    Callenwolde Fine Arts Center
    Columbia Gorge Hotel
    Cincinnati Museum Center
    City of Alexandria
    Cleveland Restoration Society
    Downtown Cultural Pass
    Foundation for Historical Louisiana
    Frank Lloyd Wright Trust
    Fox Theatre
    Hillwood Estate
    Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza
    Historic Richmond
    Historic Urban Plans, Inc
    Histpres
    Hotel Monaco Alexandria
    Jekyll Island Club Hotel
    Ladew Topiary Gardens
    Landmark Society of Western New York
    Linden Row Inn
    Lord Baltimore Hotel
    Marlene Richardson
    Melrose Plantation
    Metropolitan Hotel at the 9
    Michigan Historic Preservation Network
    Nancy Finegood
    National Preservation Institute
    New York Landmarks Conservancy
    Oheka Castle
    Oregon Historical Society
    Palmer Hotel Chicago
    Penny Jones
    Preservation Arlington
    Preservation Maryland
    Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
    President Lincoln’s Cottage
    Restore Oregon
    San Antonio Conservation Society
    Second Generation Theatre
    Skyscraper Museum
    Society of Architectural Historians
    The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union
    Tom Moriarty
    Utah Heritage Foundation
    West Baden Springs Hotel
    Westin Book Cadellac Hotel
    Woolworth Tours
    Woolly Mammoth Theatre
    Yolita Rausche

    Questions?

    Call 202-463-0970 or email foundation@preservationaction.org.

    Last Chance Auction Items

    Some great travel packages, experiences and items remain from our Auction this year! These are perfect last-minute holiday gifts for your family, friends, colleagues – or even a treat for yourself! If you have any questions, call 202-463-0970. To purchase an item, click the Bid button below the package you want. Enter the minimum bid – and off you go (to a secure credit card processing page)! We will mail these out to you ASAP, if you need them by a certain date, please call 202-463-0970.

    Select the Auction item you are interested in from the dropdown menu below, then off you go to a secure donation page to the Preservation Action Foundation. If you’d like to pay by check, please call 202-463-0970.

    Richmond: Rich in History – Sold!
    Lustron Home Panel – Sold!

    Choose your Auction Item
    Adventures in Preservatio $360Lustron House Panel $250Michigan Milestones $222Not DC As Usual $495Richmond Package $200

     

    Not D.C. As Usual

    Value: $1100/Bid: $495
    Donors: Tom Moriarty of Retail Development Strategies, Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company and The Hillwood Estate

    If you’re a DC area resident, or just want to experience a rare and new side of the Capital, this package is for you!

    DarthVader1Let Preservation Action Foundation Chairman, Tom Moriarity, take you on a personal tour of Washington, DC, exploring Capitol Hill, Georgetown, the National Cathedral and several neighborhoods, on a combined  driving/walking tour to include lunch and all needed admissions. A priceless experience!

    Visit “Where Fabulous Lives,” The Hillwood Estate, that features a Georgian mansion with the most comprehensive collection of Russian imperial art outside of Russia, a distinguished 18th-century French decorative art collection, and twenty-five acres of serene landscaped gardens and natural woodlands.

    Take in contemporary theatre thanks to Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company offering two tickets to the 2014-2015 season.

    Michigan Milestones

    Value: $495/Bid: $222
    Donors: Michigan Historic Preservation Network, The Inn on Ferry Street

    848357_24_bThe Michigan Historic Preservation Network invites you as their guest to their annual conference during National Preservation Month, in Midland, MI on May 14-16, 2015. Enjoy also a one-year membership and mug.

    Spend the night in Detroit  at the Inn on Ferry Street in Detroit in a Queen Deluxe. Included in the overnight stay is Breakfast in the Scott House, WIFI, parking and Shuttle Service anyways within a five mile radius of the inn. Based on availability.

    FYI – Midland and Detroit around less than two-hours away from each other.

    Adventures in Preservation

    Value: $800/Bid: $360
    Donors:
    Adventures in Preservation

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAiP envisions a world where people use, understand, and appreciate historic buildings that are vital to economic and environmental sustainability and preserve cultural identity.

    Adventures in Preservation is offering one spot in the “Linking Archaeology with Preservation at Fairfield Plantation” adventure in Glouster, VA, either June 7-13, 2015 or August 16-22, 2015. This registration includes home-stay lodging, breakfasts and lunches, field trips, and training and materials. Transportation not included.

     


    Richmond: Rich in History

    Value: $444/Bid: $200
    Donors: 
    The Linden Row Inn, Historic Richmond

    day-linden_row_innLinden Row Inn was lovingly restored in 1988 as a full-service Inn. The original architecture was meticulously maintained and most of the rooms are furnished with authentic antique pieces from the middle and late 1800’s. Today, the hotel is on the National Register of Historic Places and is managed by Savara Properties Inc. The property is regarded as the nation’s best surviving row of Greek revival architecture. Enjoy a one-night stay.

    Historic Richmond, instrumental in the restoration of Linden Row Inn, invites you to a private tour of Monumental Church, ca. 1814 and designed by Robert Mills, and two Quiot Club memberships, which provides access to monthly gatherings at unique locations for behind-the-scenes tours and includes drinks and hors d’oeuvers.

    Liden Row Inn expires November 11, 2015. Historic Richmond offerings to be coordinated directly with winner. 

    Luston Home Panel

    PAF's Pastfinder Auction

    Value: $500/Bid: $250
    Donors: 
    Preservation Arlington

    Truly for the preservationists or modernist who has everything – except for this!

    Arlington, VA boosted a dozen Lustron mid-century pre-fab houses but has lost several to demolitions and tear-downs. Preservation Arlington preserved individual home panels from this loss and donated this priceless item! It makes a terrific magnetic bulletin board, office art work, and a reminder of the recent past. Measures 2 feet by 2 feet.

    Preservation Action Foundation Benefit Auction

    paf-auction-2014

    Last Chance auction items are perfect for holidays gifts to friends, family, and yourself! We have travel packages to DC, Detroit and more. See all items here! →
    Our annual auction is Preservation Action Foundation’s largest fundraiser and we appreciate your support this year in Savannah.  The dollars in auction funds raised go to support the mission of the Preservation Action Foundation.

    The proceeds from this event are used to assist in education and training, advocacy for preservation policy, and programs such as the Preservation Action Foundation’s Advocacy Scholars throughout the United States. Our most visible contributions to preservation advocacy are; a weekly Legislative Update, organizing National Historic Preservation Advocacy Week, and Advocacy Scholars. The Preservation Action Foundation is a 501(c)(3) entity; your prize donation is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.

     

    Auction Sponsors

    • A. Roy Smith
    • Yolita Rausche
    • Michael Holleran
    • Peg Breen
    • Jenny Spreitzer
    • Philip Thomason
    • Trisha Logan<br>

    Auction Donors

      Adventures in Preservation
      Alta Club
      Antrium 1844 Country House Hotel
      Baltimore Symphony Orchestra
      Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site
      Brenda Barrett
      Buffalo Heritage Unlimited
      C&O Canal Trust
      Callenwolde Fine Arts Center
      Columbia Gorge Hotel
      Cincinnati Museum Center
      City of Alexandria
      Cleveland Restoration Society
      Downtown Cultural Pass
      Foundation for Historical Louisiana
      Frank Lloyd Wright Trust
      Fox Theatre
      Hillwood Estate
      Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza
      Historic Richmond
      Historic Urban Plans, Inc
      Histpres
      Hotel Monaco Alexandria
      Jekyll Island Club Hotel
      Ladew Topiary Gardens
      Landmark Society of Western New York
      Linden Row Inn
      Lord Baltimore Hotel
      Marlene Richardson
      Melrose Plantation
      Metropolitan Hotel at the 9
      Michigan Historic Preservation Network
      Nancy Finegood
      National Preservation Institute
      New York Landmarks Conservancy
      Oheka Castle
      Oregon Historical Society
      Palmer Hotel Chicago
      Penny Jones
      Preservation Arlington
      Preservation Maryland
      Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation
      President Lincoln’s Cottage
      Restore Oregon
      San Antonio Conservation Society
      Second Generation Theatre
      Skyscraper Museum
      Society of Architectural Historians
      The Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union
      Tom Moriarty
      Utah Heritage Foundation
      West Baden Springs Hotel
      Westin Book Cadellac Hotel
      Woolworth Tours
      Woolly Mammoth Theatre
      Yolita Rausche

      Questions?

      Call 202-463-0970 or email foundation@preservationaction.org.

      Last Chance Auction Items

      Some great travel packages, experiences and items remain from our Auction this year! These are perfect last-minute holiday gifts for your family, friends, colleagues – or even a treat for yourself! If you have any questions, call 202-463-0970. To purchase an item, click the Bid button below the package you want. Enter the minimum bid – and off you go (to a secure credit card processing page)! We will mail these out to you ASAP, if you need them by a certain date, please call 202-463-0970.

      Select the Auction item you are interested in from the dropdown menu below, then off you go to a secure donation page to the Preservation Action Foundation. If you’d like to pay by check, please call 202-463-0970.

      Richmond: Rich in History – Sold!
      Lustron Home Panel – Sold!

      Choose your Auction Item
      Adventures in Preservatio $360Lustron House Panel $250Michigan Milestones $222Not DC As Usual $495Richmond Package $200

       

      Not D.C. As Usual

      Value: $1100/Bid: $495
      Donors: Tom Moriarty of Retail Development Strategies, Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company and The Hillwood Estate

      If you’re a DC area resident, or just want to experience a rare and new side of the Capital, this package is for you!

      DarthVader1Let Preservation Action Foundation Chairman, Tom Moriarity, take you on a personal tour of Washington, DC, exploring Capitol Hill, Georgetown, the National Cathedral and several neighborhoods, on a combined  driving/walking tour to include lunch and all needed admissions. A priceless experience!

      Visit “Where Fabulous Lives,” The Hillwood Estate, that features a Georgian mansion with the most comprehensive collection of Russian imperial art outside of Russia, a distinguished 18th-century French decorative art collection, and twenty-five acres of serene landscaped gardens and natural woodlands.

      Take in contemporary theatre thanks to Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company offering two tickets to the 2014-2015 season.

      Michigan Milestones

      Value: $495/Bid: $222
      Donors: Michigan Historic Preservation Network, The Inn on Ferry Street

      848357_24_bThe Michigan Historic Preservation Network invites you as their guest to their annual conference during National Preservation Month, in Midland, MI on May 14-16, 2015. Enjoy also a one-year membership and mug.

      Spend the night in Detroit  at the Inn on Ferry Street in Detroit in a Queen Deluxe. Included in the overnight stay is Breakfast in the Scott House, WIFI, parking and Shuttle Service anyways within a five mile radius of the inn. Based on availability.

      FYI – Midland and Detroit around less than two-hours away from each other.

      Adventures in Preservation

      Value: $800/Bid: $360
      Donors:
      Adventures in Preservation

      OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAiP envisions a world where people use, understand, and appreciate historic buildings that are vital to economic and environmental sustainability and preserve cultural identity.

      Adventures in Preservation is offering one spot in the “Linking Archaeology with Preservation at Fairfield Plantation” adventure in Glouster, VA, either June 7-13, 2015 or August 16-22, 2015. This registration includes home-stay lodging, breakfasts and lunches, field trips, and training and materials. Transportation not included.

       


      Richmond: Rich in History

      Value: $444/Bid: $200
      Donors: 
      The Linden Row Inn, Historic Richmond

      day-linden_row_innLinden Row Inn was lovingly restored in 1988 as a full-service Inn. The original architecture was meticulously maintained and most of the rooms are furnished with authentic antique pieces from the middle and late 1800’s. Today, the hotel is on the National Register of Historic Places and is managed by Savara Properties Inc. The property is regarded as the nation’s best surviving row of Greek revival architecture. Enjoy a one-night stay.

      Historic Richmond, instrumental in the restoration of Linden Row Inn, invites you to a private tour of Monumental Church, ca. 1814 and designed by Robert Mills, and two Quiot Club memberships, which provides access to monthly gatherings at unique locations for behind-the-scenes tours and includes drinks and hors d’oeuvers.

      Liden Row Inn expires November 11, 2015. Historic Richmond offerings to be coordinated directly with winner. 

      Luston Home Panel

      PAF's Pastfinder Auction

      Value: $500/Bid: $250
      Donors: 
      Preservation Arlington

      Truly for the preservationists or modernist who has everything – except for this!

      Arlington, VA boosted a dozen Lustron mid-century pre-fab houses but has lost several to demolitions and tear-downs. Preservation Arlington preserved individual home panels from this loss and donated this priceless item! It makes a terrific magnetic bulletin board, office art work, and a reminder of the recent past. Measures 2 feet by 2 feet.